Strasbourg

Alsace had several times to change its nationality. Having been part of France and Germany, the region took the best from both countries. Its historical capital, the city of Strasbourg is the perfect place to check this combination.

European district. So called the area where the headquarters of the European Parliament, the European Court of Human Rights and the Council of Europe are situated. If you are interested in politics, try to go on a tour, if not - admire modern architecture (the Palace of Human Rights, for example, was built by Richard Rogers).

German district. Being in Alsace on a presidential visit, Nicolas Sarkozy called the region - Germany. It can be easily understood because Alsace did not become part of France that long ago. This is especially felt in the German area of Strasbourg, built up after the victory of Prussia over France in 1870.

Alsatian cuisine. Like everything else, it is a mixture of German and French traditions. More simple and satisfying than the French, more elegant and diverse than the German, it can please and locals and the visitors. Choucroute (cabbage with meat) would be the most famous dish, but also some foie gras, pot-o-feu, and tarte flambée.

Little France. It is the most charming district of Strasbourg, with half-timbered houses, gateways, and bridges. This island, separated from the city by the branch of the river. There you can try Choucroute at L’Ami Schutz restaurant, and continue your visit to the well-known Museum of Modern Art.